Braking

Probably the most important safety feature of your car
Know how it works
Know how to fix it if it doesn't work

Interactive Tool

Brake Pedal
When you press your brake pedal, compression on the brake fluid will eventually stop your vehicle.
Master Cylinder
Inside the master cylinder are two brake lines full of fluid. Fluid is considered incompressible. So when you actually try to compress it, it sends a force through the brake line essentially squeezing the brakes.

Brake Pads

Brake Fluid
​Reservoir

Brake Pads

AntiLock Brake
System Module

Brake Fluid
Reservoir
The reservoir acts as an overflow for your master cylinder. Compressing and decompressing the fluid in the master cylinder allows the fluid to rise and fall. If your reservoir is empty you might have a brake in the line.

Master
Cylinder

Under the Hood

In the Cabin

ABS Module
The antilock brake systems will be engaged when the pedal is completely compressed. It will rapidly engage and disengage the brakes in order to help you turn your car while pressing the brake.

Brake Pedal

Gas Pedal

Brake Pads
The pads will squeeze the rotors so tight that your wheels will stop turning. The fluid being pushed in the brake lines will squeeze a metal plate on the back of the pads essentially squeezing the rotors.

Back Driver Side Brake

Back Passenger Side Brake

Various Brake Pictures

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Brake Pedal acting on push rod

Rod Going into the Master Brake Cylinder

Spring to pull push rod and disengaging brakes

Close Up of Push Rod